Q and A

Question

What is the normal range for CD8? Does it change soon after infection?

What is the normal range of cd8 in healthy persons and does it increase or decrease after getting hiv infection?

Answer

The normal range for CD8 is 150-1000 cells/mm3.

CD8 counts tend to increase after HIV infection but also reduce after starting treatment.

CD4 and CD8 cells are used by the immune system to attack and break down an infection.  CD8 cells are called the ‘killer cells’ and they recognise and kill cells that are infected with a virus.  Sometimes these process and function overlap and is also known as cellular immunity. CD4 cells are called the ‘helper cells’ because they help the immune response by sending signals to CD8 cells.

With HIV, the CD4 count is used to track the progression of HIV infection and disease.  The CD4 cells count may be compared to the CD8 cell count, and the result is expressed as a ratio (CD4:CD8). However the absolute CD4 T-cell count is the most important value.

The normal range of CD4 count for a HIV negative person is between 400 – 1600 cells/mm3.  Your CD4 count will drop a few weeks after infection with HIV.  Then as the body immune system begins to fight back, it will slowly go up again.  It usually takes about 3 – 6 months after the infection stabilised, but for some people it can take longer.  If you are newly diagnosed then you would need your CD4 test done every 3 months.

Please see this link for more information.

12 comments

  1. Roy Trevelion

    Dear Muru,

    Sorry, we are not doctors at i-Base. But we do give up to date HIV treatment information. HIV is successfully treated with ARVs. Vitamins and minerals that are necessary for everyone’s good health can be found in a balanced diet. Please see this guide to a balanced diet and your health.

  2. Muru

    WBC – 5700
    Lymphocytes ABS – 3554
    CD4 Helpers – 21%
    CD4 ABD – 758
    CD8 Helpers – 51
    CD8 ABS – 1810
    CD4:CD8 – 0.42

    dear Dr.
    What are the vitamins you will recommend for this HIV patient?

    Thank you.

Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *